WHAT ARE DIGITAL RIGHTS?

At The IO Foundation, we understand Digital Rights as an extension of Human Rights. We believe that people should be protected by the same principles embodied by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in any context, including all sorts of digital environments whether they are of public access (usually Internet, though not exclusively) or private networks.
Many charters have been drafted and approved over recent years in an attempt to protect such rights in the Internet. At TIOF we believe this approach, while eminently useful, does not provide a fully fledged coverage of protection. We prefer to use the term Digital Domain, which represents any digital space that a user is interacting with. Therefore, we aim to extend the protection to any Digital Domain to prevent strategies that would circumvent the protections that Internet Charters wish to provide.

On the other hand, a common accepted practice is to regulate critical aspects of our lives in order to protect people. We have laws on industries such as automobile, food, drugs or construction. All those are crafted to protect the safety and well-being of their users. It is however surprising that there are no regulations on software design that would ensure the same level of safety. While there are law regulations to protect abuse of users, these are restricted to the space of reaction. Software, by design, should be regulated under similar mandates to make sure that Human Rights are respected at all given times, transparently for the user.

As a result, we understand that there is still space to establish a more broad document that covers every user under any digital interaction. We call it the Universal Declaration of Digital Rights.

Our main and long term focus is to reach out to relevant bodies of governance to raise awareness on this matter so that we can all work together towards a proclamation of the UDDR at the General Assembly of the United Nations.

Join us in this task. Be part of the movement. Protect your rights.

WHAT ARE DIGITAL RIGHTS?

At The IO Foundation, we understand Digital Rights as an extension of Human Rights. We believe that people should be protected by the same principles embodied by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in any context, including all sorts of digital environments whether they are of public access (usually Internet, though not exclusively) or private networks.

Many charters have been drafted and approved over recent years in an attempt to protect such rights in the Internet. At TIOF we believe this approach, while eminently useful, does not provide a fully fledged coverage of protection. We prefer to use the term Digital Domain, which represents any digital space that a user is interacting with. Therefore, we aim to extend the protection to any Digital Domain to prevent strategies that would circumvent the protections that Internet Charters wish to provide.

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On the other hand, a common accepted practice is to regulate critical aspects of our lives in order to protect people. We have laws on industries such as automobile, food, drugs or construction. All those are crafted to protect the safety and well-being of their users. It is however surprising that there are no regulations on software design that would ensure the same level of safety. While there are law regulations to protect abuse of users, these are restricted to the space of reaction. Software, by design, should be regulated under similar mandates to make sure that Human Rights are respected at all given times, transparently for the user.

As a result, we understand that there is still space to establish a more broad document that covers every user under any digital interaction. We call it the Universal Declaration of Digital Rights.

Our main and long term focus is to reach out to relevant bogies of governance to raise awareness on this matter so that we can all work together towards a proclamation of the UDDR at the General Assembly of the United Nations.

Join us in this task. Be part of the movement. Protect your rights.